Thu. Aug 11th, 2022

Birds are light weight vertebrate creatures with feathers, beak, four-chambered heart and air sacs. They lay hard shelled eggs and have a high metabolic rate. Birds can be classified into different families. Psittaciformes, Passeriformes, Columbiformes, Piciformes, aseriforms, goliformes etc containing numerous species (more than 10000 species). People are attracted to the beauty of plumage colour and songs of these birds and rear them in their home as pet birds.

The meaning of pet is narrated as ‘any animal or bird that has at home for pleasure, not for work or food’. Preference of bird species to keep as pet varies depending on geographical locates weather, culture and wild life. Protection all of the country. Many times birds are imported from other counters to use as pet birds. International trade for psittacine birds (except pesch cage lovebird, coclatalils Indian ring. neck parakeets, budgeries) is regulated by convention on international trade in endangers species wild flora fauna (CITES)

EXOTIC PET BIRDS

  • FINCHES
  • CANARIES
  • BUDGERIGARS
  • COCKATAIELS
  • AMAZON PARROT
  • MACAW
  • SENEGAL PARROT
  • GREY PARROT
  • COCKATOO
  • LOVEBIRD

FINCHES

Finches are the perfect alternative for those wanting a feathered pet but not prepared to take on the challenges of caring for a parrot. Finches don’t talk and are hands-off birds, but they delight their owners with their aerial antics and social interactions with one another.

Care & Feeding; Finches need spacious housing, especially since they spend most, if not all, of their time inside their enclosure. These birds should remain fully flighted instead of having trimmed wing feathers. A horizontal cage is a must (as opposed to a vertical cage). Finches are flock animals and thrive when housed with other finches (do not house a finch with a parrot because a parrot can injure a finch). If you house pairs of finches together, be prepared for possible offspring, especially if the finches are provided a nest (small wicker-basket) and nesting material.

Some finches can be housed in same-sex pairs (a male finch with a male finch or a female finch with a female finch) to avoid the possibility of breeding but it depends on the finch species as well as possibly the time of the year. Consult an experienced finch breeder to see which same-sex finch pairs are most likely to get along. Likewise, if you plan on keeping an aviary of mixed finch species, consult an experienced finch breeder first, because some finch species can be aggressive toward other finch species, especially during breeding season.

A finch will thrive on a pelleted base diet, such as Lafeber’s Premium Daily Diet specifically designed for finches, supplemented with fresh greens and other vegetables, grubs, egg food and some seed.

  • Color-Multi Colored   Size-small 
  • Lifespan-Up to 10 years 
  • Sounds-Chatterer                                                                                                                                     

CANARY

The domestic canary, often simply known as the canary (Serinus canaria forma domestica), is a domesticated form of the wild canary, a small songbird in the finch family originating from the Macaronesian Islands (The Azores, Madeira and the Canary Islands).

Canaries were first bred in captivity in the 17th century. They were brought over by Spanish sailors to Europe. This bird became expensive and fashionable to breed in courts of Spanish and English kings. Monks started breeding them and only sold the males (which sing). This kept the birds in short supply and drove the price up. Eventually, Italians obtained hens and were able to breed the birds. This made them very popular, resulted in many breeds arising, and the birds being bred all over Europe. The same occurred in England. First, the birds were only owned by the rich, but eventually, the local citizens started to breed them and, again, they became very popular. Many breeds arose through selective breeding, and they are still very popular today for their voices.

From the eighteenth up to twentieth century’s, canaries and finches were used in the UK, Canada and USA in the coal mining industry, to detect carbon monoxide. In the UK, this practice ceased in 1986.

Typically, the domestic canary is kept as a popular cage and aviary bird. Given proper housing and care, a canary’s lifespan ranges from 10 to 15 years.

BUDGERIGAR

The budgerigar ( Melopsittacus undulatus) is a long-tailed, seed-eating parrot usually nicknamed the budgie, or in American English, the parakeet. Budgies are the only species in the genus Melopsittacus. Naturally, the species is green and yellow with black, scalloped markings on the nape, back, and wings. Budgies are bred in captivity with the colouring of blues, whites, yellows, greys, and even with small crests. Juveniles and chicks are monomorphic, while adults are told apart by their cere colouring and their behaviour.

The origin of the budgie’s name is unclear. First recorded in 1805, budgerigars are popular pets around the world due to their small size, low cost, and ability to mimic human speech. They are the third most popular pet in the world, after the domesticated dog and cat. Budgies are nomadic flock parakeets that have been bred in captivity since the 19th century. In both captivity and the wild, budgerigars breed opportunistically and in pairs.

Found wild throughout the drier parts of Australia, prior to colonization they had survived harsh inland conditions for five million years. The budgerigar is closely related to lories and the fig parrots budgerigar

The cockatiel (Nymphicus hollandicus), also known as miniature cockatoo, were, or quadroon, is a bird that is a member of its own branch of the cockatoo family endemic to Australia. They are prized as household pets and companion parrots throughout the world and are relatively easy to breed. As a caged bird, cockatiels are second in popularity only to the budgerigar.

COCKATIEL

The cockatiel is the only member of the genus Nymphicus. It was previously considered a crested parrot or small cockatoo; however, more recent molecular studies have assigned it to its own subfamily, Nymphicinae. It is, therefore, now classified as the smallest of the Cacatuidae (cockatoo family). Cockatiels are native to Australia, and favor the Australian wetlands, scrublands, and bush lands.

The cockatiel’s lifespan in captivity is generally given as 16 to 25 years,[9] though it is sometimes given as short as 10 to 15 years, and there are reports of cockatiels living as long as 32 years, the oldest confirmed specimen reported being 36 years old. Diet and exercise are major determining factors. If fed correctly a cockatiel can live up to 20 years. Worldwide there are currently 22 cockatiel colour mutations established in aviculture with eight being exclusive to Australia. Mutations in captivity have emerged in various colors, some quite different from those observed in nature. Wild cockatiels are grey with visible differences between males and females. Male grey cockatiels typically have yellow heads while the female has a grey head. Juveniles tend to look like females with pinker beaks. The pied mutation first appeared in California in 1949. This mutation is a blotch of colour on an otherwise solid-coloured bird. For example, this may appear as a grey blotch on a yellow cockatiel.

LOVEBIRD

A lovebird is the common name of Agapornis , a small genus of parrot. Eight species are native to the African continent, with the grey-headed lovebird being native to Madagascar.

Social and affectionate, the name comes from the parrots’ strong, monogamous pair bonding and the long periods which paired birds spend sitting together. Lovebirds live in small flocks and eat fruit, vegetables, grasses, and seeds. Black-winged lovebirds also eat insects and figs, and black-collared lovebirds have a special dietary requirement for native figs, making them problematic to keep in captivity.

Grooming as with pet parrots in general, the tips of lovebirds’ toenails should wear down adequately by the parrot climbing over rough surfaced perches. If the parrot has an inactive lifestyle the toenails may grow long and need to be trimmed. Only the very tips of the toenails are trimmed. If too much of a toenail is trimmed away, it will be painful and bleed from the blood vessels in the centre of the nail. This bleeding should be stopped as soon as possible with the use of styptic gel or powder. Sharp pointed toenails can be blunted by simply filing the point. These procedures are usually done with the help of an assistant carefully holding the parrot wrapped in a towel.

Some species are kept as pets, and several coloured mutations have been selectively bred in aviculture. The average lifespan is 10 to 15 years.

COCKATOO

A cockatoo is any of the 21 parrot species belonging to the family Cacatuidae, the only family in the superfamily Cacatuoidea. Along with the Psittacoidea (true parrots) and the Strigopoidea (large New Zealand parrots), they make up the order Psittaciformes. The family has a mainly Australasian distribution, ranging from the Philippines and the eastern Indonesian islands of Wallacea to New Guinea, the Solomon Islands and Australia.

Cockatoos are recognisable by the prominent crests and curved bills. Their plumage is generally less colorful than that of other parrots, being mainly white, grey or black and often with coloured features in the crest, cheeks or tail. On average they are larger than other parrots; however, the cockatiel, the smallest cockatoo species, is a small bird. The phylogenetic

 Position of the cockatiel remains unresolved, other than that it is one of the earliest offshoots of the cockatoo lineage. The remaining species are in two main clades. The five large black coloured cockatoos of the genus Calyptorhynchus form one branch. The second and larger branch is formed by the genus Cacatua, comprising 11 species of white-plumaged cockatoos and four monotypic genera that branched off earlier; namely the pink and white Major Mitchell’s cockatoo, the pink and grey galah, the mainly grey gang-gang cockatoo and the large black-plumaged palm cockatoo.

Cockatoos prefer to eat seeds, tubers, corms, fruit, flowers and insects. They often feed in large flocks, particularly when ground-feeding. Cockatoos are monogamous and nest in tree hollows. Some cockatoo species have been adversely affected by habitat loss, particularly from a shortage of suitable nesting hollows after large mature trees are cleared; conversely, some species have adapted well to human changes and are considered agricultural pests.

Cockatoos are popular birds in aviculture, but their needs are difficult to meet. The cockatiel is the easiest cockatoo species to maintain and is by far the most frequently kept in captivity. White cockatoos are more commonly found in captivity than black cockatoos. Illegal trade in wild-caught birds contributes to the decline of some cockatoo species in the wild.

GREY PARROT

The grey parrot (Psittacus erithacus), also known as the Congo grey parrot, Congo African grey parrot or African grey parrot, is an Old World parrot in the family Psittacidae. The Timneh parrot (Psittacus timneh) was earlier treated as a subspecies but has since been elevated to a full species.

The grey parrot is a medium-sized, predominantly grey, black-billed parrot. Its typical weight is 400 g (0.88 lb), with a length around 33 cm (13 in), and a wingspan of 46–52 cm (18–20 in). It has darker grey over the head and both wings, while the head and body feathers have a slight white edge to them. The tail feathers are red. Due to selection by parrot breeders, some grey parrots are partly or completely red. Both sexes appear similar. The colouration of juveniles is similar to that of adults, but the eye is typically dark grey to black, in comparison to the yellow irises around dark eyes of the adult birds. The undertail coverts are also tinged with grey. The adults weigh 418–526 grams (0.922–1.160 lb).

Grey parrots may live for 40–60 years in captivity, although their mean lifespan in the wild appears to be shorter at about 23 years.

They are mostly frugivorous; most of their diet consists of fruit, nuts, and seeds. The species prefers oil palm fruit and also eat flowers and tree bark, as well as insects and snails. In the wild, the grey parrot is partly a ground feeder. In captivity, it can eat bird pellets, a variety of fruits such as pear, orange, pomegranate, apple, and banana, and vegetables such as carrot, cooked sweet potato, celery, fresh kale, peas, and green beans. They also need a source of calcium.

MACAW

Ara is a neotropical genus of macaws with eight extant species and at least two extinct species. The genus name was coined by French naturalist Bernard Germain de Lacépède in 1799. It gives its name to and is part of the Arini, or tribe of Neotropical parrots. The genus name Ara is likely related to arara, a Portuguese word for Ara, itself derived from the Tupi word arara.

The Ara macaws are large striking parrots with long tails, long narrow wings and vividly coloured plumage. They all have a characteristic bare face patch around the eyes. Males and females have similar plumage. Many of its members are popular in the pet trade, and bird smuggling is a threat to several species.

The Ara macaws are large parrots ranging from 46–51 cm (18–20 in) in length and 285 to 287 g (10 oz) in weight in the chestnut-fronted macaw to 90–95 cm (35.5–37.5 in) 1,708 g (60.2 oz) in the green-winged macaw. The wings of these macaws are long and narrow which is typical for species of parrot which travel long distances in order to forage. They have a massive downward curved upper mandible and a patch of pale skin around the eye that extends to base of the beak. The skin patch bears minute feathers arranged in lines that form a pattern over the otherwise bare skin in all species of the genus except the scarlet macaw in which the skin is bare. In most species the bill is black, but the scarlet macaw and green-winged macaw have a predominantly horn coloured upper mandible and a black lower one.

The colours in the plumage of the Ara macaws are spectacular. Four species are predominantly green, two species are mostly blue and yellow, and three species (including the extinct Cuban macaw) mostly red. There is no sexual dimorphism in the plumage, and that of the juveniles is similar to adults, although slightly duller in some species.

CONURE

The sun parakeet (Aratinga solstitialis), also known in aviculture as the sun conure, is a medium-sized, vibrantly colored parrot native to northeastern South America. The adult male and female are similar in appearance, with predominantly golden-yellow plumage and orange-flushed under parts and face. Sun parakeets are very social birds, typically living in flocks. They form monogamous pairs for reproduction, and nest in palm cavities in the tropics. Sun parakeets mainly feed on fruits, flowers, berries, blossoms, seeds, nuts, and insects. Conures are commonly bred and kept in aviculture and may live up to 30 years. This species is currently threatened by loss of habitat and trapping for plumage or the pet trade. Sun parakeets are now listed as endangered by the IUCN.

On average, sun parakeets weigh around 110 g (4 oz) and are around 30 cm (12 in) long. The sexes are similar in plumage. Adults have a rich yellow crown, nape, mantle, lesser wing-coverts, tips of the greater wing-coverts, chest, and underwing-coverts. The face and belly are orange with red around the ears. The base of the greater wing-coverts, tertials, and base of the primaries are green, while the secondaries, tips of the primaries, and most of the primary coverts are dark blue. The tail is olive-green with a blue tip. From below, all the flight feathers are dark greyish. The bill is black. The legs and the bare eye-ring are grey, but the latter often fades to white in captivity (so using amount of grey or white in the eye-ring for determining “purity” of an individual can be misleading). It is easily confused with the closely related jandaya parakeet and sulphur-breasted parakeet, but the former has entirely green wing-coverts, mantle, and vent, while the latter has green mottling to the mantle and less orange to the under parts. The sun parakeet is also superficially similar to the pale-billed. Super Sun Conure is often also named by breeders as (Yellow-Factor Sun Conure) since there is also (Red-Factor Sun Conure)

SENEGAL PARROT

The Senegal parrot (Poicephalus senegalus) is a parrot which is a resident breeder across a wide range of West Africa. It makes migrations within west Africa, according to the availability of the fruit, seeds and blossoms which make up its diet. These birds are considered a farm pest in Africa, often feeding on maize or millet. It is popular in aviculture.

Senegal parrots are about 23 centimetres (9.1 inches) long, weigh about 120 to 170 grams (4.2 to 6.0 ounces). They have a relatively large head and beak for their overall size, and feathers form a short broad tail. Adults have a charcoal grey head, grey beak, bright yellow irises, green back and throat, and yellow underparts and rump. The yellow and green areas on a Senegal parrot’s front form a V-shape resembling a yellow vest worn over green. Young Juveniles have dark grey, almost black, irises, which change to light grey.

Senegal parrots are not sexually dimorphic, but there are some hypotheses which sometimes might help to determine the gender of adult birds:

    The V-shape of the vest is usually longer in females; in females the green area extends down over the chest to between the legs, whereas in males the tip of the green area ends midway down the chest.

    The female’s beak and head are generally slightly smaller and narrower than the male’s.

    The under-tail covert feathers (short feathers under the base of the main tail feathers) are generally mostly yellow in the male and generally mostly green in the female.

    Males are generally, but not always, larger and heavier than female birds.

AMAZON PARROT

Amazon parrot is the common name for a parrot of the genus Amazona. These are medium-sized parrots native to the New World ranging from South America to Mexico and the Caribbean.

Most amazon parrots are predominantly green, with accenting colors that depend on the species and can be quite vivid. They feed primarily on seeds, nuts, and fruits, supplemented by leafy matter.

Many amazon parrots have a remarkable ability to mimic human speech and other sounds. Partly because of this, they are popular as pets or companion parrots, and a small industry has developed in breeding parrots in captivity for this market. This popularity has led to many parrots being taken from the wild to the extent that some species have become threatened. The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora treaty has made the capture of wild parrots for the pet trade illegal in an attempt to help protect wild populations.

The yellow-headed amazon, yellow-naped amazons, orange-winged Amazon, and turquoise-fronted amazon are some of the amazon parrot species which are commonly kept as pets. Amazon parrots, together with macaws and the grey parrot, are all known for their exceptional vocal abilities, playfulness, and dexterity with their feet. Well-trained parrots can be loyal companions, and they can live for 50 years or sometimes more in captivity. However, some amazons – even well-trained ones – can become aggressive, possibly during mating season. To maintain health and happiness, pet parrots require much more training than domesticated animals such as dogs or even cats. They require understanding, manipulative toys, and rewards for good pet-like behavior, or they can develop quite aggressive behaviors. They have a strong, innate need to chew; thus, they require safe, destructible toys.

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